Gallimaufry: two thirds joined up

It’s almost done. I have 60% of it joined up.

I really, really like that narrow dark blue sashing between the squares. It puts a nice crisp edge on them, lines everything up, and is dark enough to throw everything else into contrast. Give me to the end of the week and I’ll have the joining up done and be ready to get the binding on.

There was a point halfway through making the blocks when I had a moment of doubt. Would it clash with the bird/seashell fabric for Miz Lizzie’s curtains?  I don’t think so, on reflection. What do you think? Even if it’s a little bit off, I love this quilt. Can’t wait to use it for the first time on our next trip. Sadly that’ll probably not be till October :-/

Hope the good weather holds so I can take the final photos outside. Then you’ll see what it really looks like…

Gallimaufry: all quilted

That’s that lot done.

Now for the trimming out and then joining up, always the least enjoyable part, but necessary 🙂 I need some more dark blue for the front sashing, there’s not enough left over from the Blue Hour quilt to get the job finished. I must also remember to use light blue thread or it’ll show up too much against the light blue backing – so long as I stitch carefully in the ditch on the fronts, it won’t show against the dark blue on the quilt front, as I discovered on Blue Hour, when I used cream thread. I like the effect of the pale coral thread against the dark blue, it’s pretty. Not sure how noticeable it is compared with cream, but I know it’s there, which is all that really matters.

I didn’t do my neatest ever job of hand-quilting the Miz Lizzie block in a big stitch and a variety of thread colours, but it’s cute and puffy and I like it!

Just a short post today, I have work to do for ScrapHappy and the SAL, which are both due this weekend!

Gallimaufry: let the quilting begin

Right, final (probably) layout.

I say probably because I don’t rule out wanting to swap a couple of blocks once they’re all quilted. In fact I can see two right now that I want to change. Funny how you can’t see it for looking in real life, but it jumps out at you in a photo….

I’ve cut batting and backing for the first row, and now I need to have a hard (but short) think about how this is going to be quilted. If I go with the cross hatching I did on the Blue Hour quilt, I’ll be running over some of the features that make the blocks interesting. On the other hand, it’s a much longer job if I come up with custom designs for each style of block. Perhaps a combination is the right idea: cross hatching on the simpler scrappy, snowball and 9-patch blocks, and something a bit different on the sunray, twister and bubbles blocks. The trick will be to keep to the same amount of quilting so that the blocks stay the same size in the end. Too much close quilting = smaller block.

Whatever I end up doing, I’ll have that gorgeous pale coral pink thread to work with 🙂

Gallimaufry, Lines 5 and 6

So, the blocks are done.

I have just managed to squeak all of them out of the dark blues I had, with a bit of creative cutting and splicing. Funny, I thought it was the lights I’d run out of first, but maybe I was a bit generous with all those lovely batik indigos.

This is definitely not the order in which they’ll appear in the quilt, but I’ve kept to the drawing sequence in completing all the blocks so I have the right number of each. Next post will show what I hope is the final arrangement of the whole thing, although as always I’ll tweak as I go along as improvements strike me.

How do you like my caravan appliqué? I couldn’t resist a bit of fun, and I particularly love those bubbly clouds… Miz Lizzie lacks the necessary windowsills so I can’t actually have teapots and flowerpots on display, but they do dress this little window nicely 🙂

Here’s the full set, looking a bit bottom heavy, but that will all change next time.

Gallimaufry Line 1

OK, this is definitely the last one before we head off.

It’s Line 1, the top row. As I make more blocks, it’s more and more apparent that there will need to be some swapping around of blocks to balance the balance of lights and darks. I like this row a lot, but it throws Line 3 out a bit.

I’ve chosen a cool pale blue homespun for the backing and back sashing, and I think I may use dark blue front sashing to give a clean visual punctuation to each block. When I get back, I’ll cut the backing and batting squares so I’m ready to go once the front blocks are finished.

Here’s the lineup so far. Just two more rows to go!

 

Gallimaufry Line 2

Yup. Another 5 blocks done.

Halfway through the piecing, I’m fairly confident I’ll want to switch a few blocks around, perhaps not the type of block, but perhaps the colour balance.

I’ve also decided that I’ll quilt it in a warm coral-y shade of pink, rather than cream to match the Blue Hour quilt. I really like how it looks against both the beige backgrounds and the very dark blues. What do you think?

Tomorrow I have to pack the caravan and get a few things ready for the off on Thursday morning, but I hope to get a few more blocks done before I go. I’ll be taking the Anemone big hexies project to work on, in the event that we don’t find plenty of other things to do while we’re in Airlie Beach and over on Hamilton Island for the day on Friday. We’ll definitely be eating out a couple of times, so I won’t need to do heaps of cooking, which will be a nice break. And if I remember, I’ll take a photo of the Blue Hour quilt on the Husband’s bunk, looking gorgeous.

Here’s the line up to date:

 

Gallimaufry Line 4

The excitement persists. I’ve made another row!

Line 3 was appliqué and traditional piecing, with a light sprinkling of Y-seams. I thought it was time to introduce something new. So on line 4 we have scrappy and traditional piecing, paper piecing and appliqué. I thought the sunrise block would be harder than it actually was, but I just drew it out on gridded quilt design paper, stitched the fabric directly to the reverse of the drawing, and then appliquéd the ‘sun’ into the corner. I’m not afraid of piecing curves, but I like the look of the blanket stitch – it’s almost lacy.

That block on the left isn’t as wonky as it looks, it’s just the way it’s hanging on the design wall. I could go back and re-photograph, but I’m sure you get the idea!

If I can get all 5 blocks in a row done each time, I think it would look good in each post if I can stack the photos of the finished rows in order. It does mean that if I jump ahead and do line 6 soon (so I can play with the caravan appliqué, of course!), there’ll be another gap. I’ll see how it looks, but I still like the idea of building the quilt row by row, visually as well as literally.

So, which row shall I play with next? Perhaps I should start at the beginning…