Storing up gold…

I have had a plethora of passionfruit.

My own vines are still too tiny to produce, but all around the neighbourhood, there are green globes hanging in great profusion from passionfruit vines. Often, as the fruit ripens, it lies unattended and unwanted on the ground for the birds to attack. There are just so many, and when they fall outside fences or on the verge of the roadside, I pick them up and bring them home. When I have enough, I hoard the resulting gold.

The fresh pulp produces the most intensely coloured and flavoured juice when you have sieved out all the pips. I had 150ml, just enough for a small jarful of passionfruit curd.

Experience has taught me that home grown eggs just have too much flavour for the classic curd recipe of fruit juice, sugar, butter and egg yolks; the mixture ends up ‘eggy’ if you use enough eggs to set the mixture.

So I added 75g caster sugar, 3 tblsps cornflour (corn starch) and a tiny pinch of salt to the juice, stirred constantly in a small pan over low heat until the mixture thickened, cooked it for a further 5 minutes, still stirring, and then added a tablespoon of cream at the end to enrich it. You could also use unsalted butter or coconut cream instead; the former will give a more ‘classic’ flavour, the latter a hint of tropical yumminess. It’s a little runny when warm and just made, but sets up firm in the fridge after a few hours.

This stuff is dynamite. It’s intense, tangy and vivid on the tastebuds. Some of the passionfruit weren’t 100% ripe and the acidity is just what is needed to prevent the mixture being dulled by the starch. Dessert tonight is a tablespoonful stirred through a small bowl of Greek yoghurt. Just heaven.

It won’t keep, so I’ll have to eat it quickly. Oh, the hardship…

17 thoughts on “Storing up gold…

  1. Going Batty in Wales says:

    I was given a passionfruit vine which someone in the Welsh class had grown from a cutting and I waited eagerly for it to fruit – only to discover it is the wrong type with small orange fruit full of hairs. Maybe one day I will treat myself to the yummy sort. Enjoy your foraged bounty.

    • katechiconi says:

      Hmmm, vines grown from cuttings are rarely promising, since grafts are the standard. You need a robust root stock with a prolific fruiter grafted on. If you ever decide to grow one from a nursery, I recommend either Panama Gold or Panama Red for large, juicy fruit. Do also buy them in pairs so they can cross pollinate – not strictly necessary, but it definitely helps!

  2. claire93 says:

    looks delicious

  3. Caroline says:

    Not sure I’ve ever had passionfruit but the colour is wonderful

    • katechiconi says:

      It’s beautiful, isn’t it? Not everyone likes passionfruit, but it’s such a common thing here in the tropics, and like mangoes around here, they often go to waste because there are so many!

  4. We called it Maracujá and I remember it being heavenly. What a beautiful and delicious way to store gold…now I’m hungry…

  5. My favourite way to eat curd is also with yoghurt and there’s a jar in the fridge to go on top of the G.O.’s favourite way to eat it… with rice pudding.

    • katechiconi says:

      Oooh, that would work well too. Or as little jam tarts. I must say, I’m liking this recipe better than my standard one with eggs; there’s a good bit less sugar too, so the zing factor is high!

  6. nanacathy2 says:

    My mouth is watering….

  7. so colourful. Thank you

    • katechiconi says:

      It was the most brilliant shade of gold. But it’s all gone now! This simplified recipe keeps much better than the traditional version; if only I had the need to test that out, but sadly it was gone in a flash…

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