$11R: Completed and bound

I debated whether to wait for ScrapHappy day with this…

But I wanted to share this finish, and I’ll still have a week to come up with a new scrappy project for 15th June. You haven’t seen the back yet, so here it is. It isn’t very harmonious or designed-looking, but it is a scrappy quilt backing in the best tradition 🙂

The binding consists of 6 inch lengths of the blue batiks I used for the sashing on the back, alternating with triples of 2 inch scrappy squares. Because they’re broken up with multi-colour strips, the blues don’t look too repetitive, and doing it this way has enabled me to use up even more scraps without too many thick seams to negotiate.

I’m really happy with how this quilt turned out. It makes me smile just to look at it. There will probably be others of the same sort in my future, because it’s such a good way to use scraps (and I still have those paler blocks to use!), but I’ll try different permutations so I don’t end up with an endless variation on the same theme. What I like about this one is how my $11 dark blue fabric frames the colours and makes each panel seem to be floating on a multicoloured back-lit field. As a previous commenter said: it looks like stained glass.

Now, back to the drawing board. I have a new ScrapHappy project to devise!

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$11R: back to the scraps…

… for scrappy backs.

Sorry the focus is a bit varied, but I had to stand on a stool to get all them all in the shot, and the ones running off to the right have lost their sharpness.

These aren’t as pretty or varied or intricate as the fronts, but I’m pleased to say I’ve fairly quickly achieved backs for all 20 blocks out of my larger scraps. By which I mean pieces a fair bit smaller than a fat quarter, many with chunks cut out of them or wonky edges, or several smaller pieces of the same fabric, and all left over from prior projects. And I definitely haven’t been precious about how I mixed them up. Many of the scraps were unlikely to find a home in other quilts: a too-large or bold pattern, a not quite right colour balance, a fabric I no longer liked or had grown tired of, or which was too specific to a particular project. This way, they have a valuable role as part of this rainbow-hued quilt rather than leading “lives of quiet desperation”* in the back of my cupboard.

I’ve made the same number of blocks of each colour for the backs as I have for the fronts. Effectively, the quilt will be virtually reversible, but complex and bright on the front and simple and blocky on the back. I’m going to have a rootle through my scrap jelly roll strips for sashing for the back. The selection will be heavy on the blues, as I eliminated a lot that were the wrong hue from the selection for the Bonnard quilt, but it should still be interesting to look at.

So, nearly ready to start sandwiching and quilting. I reckon it’ll be ready in time for the show… 🙂

*Walden, by Henry David Thoreau

Gallimaufry Line 1

OK, this is definitely the last one before we head off.

It’s Line 1, the top row. As I make more blocks, it’s more and more apparent that there will need to be some swapping around of blocks to balance the balance of lights and darks. I like this row a lot, but it throws Line 3 out a bit.

I’ve chosen a cool pale blue homespun for the backing and back sashing, and I think I may use dark blue front sashing to give a clean visual punctuation to each block. When I get back, I’ll cut the backing and batting squares so I’m ready to go once the front blocks are finished.

Here’s the lineup so far. Just two more rows to go!

 

Miz Lizzie Adventures: tiny sewing

Well, you didn’t think I’d get through an entire holiday without sewing, did you?

I’d packed Lilibet, the tiny sewing machine, my mini steam iron, a sleeve board for ironing on, my smallest cutting mat and ruler and a couple of bags of scraps. This morning, it was time to give it all a try.

80cm square instead of a whole room…

Lilibet, sadly, is a grumpy little princess of a sewing machine. I have lost count of the number of times I’ve had to rethread her today. There was no sign of this temper-amental behaviour at home, and I’m now wondering what her game is. On the other hand, it’s still faster than sewing by hand, so I’m just growling quietly at her instead of hurling her across the caravan. Also, if you only pay $99 for a sewing machine, you only get $99 of value, and I can’t expect the same level of performance as I get with my lovely and now much more appreciated Janome DC3018.

That iron is 6 inches long, and the handle folds down

The mini iron, on the other hand, has been brilliant! Perfect for small sewing like today’s work, and it has a powerful little steam boost if you press the button. It’s very small, very light, and it did sterling work without any complaint for several hours. I’ve brought a sleeve board with me, as opposed to a whole ironing board. It’s fine for the seams on an individual block, but if I ever want to press anything larger, I’ll have to rethink my strategy. I have the inkling of an idea already, but need to test the theory before I go public, but it involves creating a special heat-reflective pad to fit over the narrow bench you see in this photo.

I have ready one of the two blocks I’m planning for ScrapHappy in a week’s time. It’s due two days after we get home, so unless I do the work now, I’ll have nothing to show, shock horror!  You’ll have to wait till then to see them, but the more eagle-eyed among you may already have concluded that one of them will be purple!  I’ll finish the second one tomorrow, after our planned outing.

Where are we going?  To a water-buffalo farm, of course!  There’ll be cheese sampling, gelato sampling by the Husband and probably a few purchases of buffalo meats. Oh, and lunch in the café, naturally…