ROYGBIV and a couple more

…. I don’t think the rainbow normally features teal, pink, black, white, beige, grey or brown.

The scrap tangle is conquered! We are down to manageable proportions, and the boxes, baskets and buckets are all sorted. I had to add a box for brown (a colour that does not generally please me much) because I had an unaccountably large number of brown scraps. Who knew? I shall have to find a way to use these not so lovely fragments. The beiges and greys, cream, black and white in another box, and then finally, the rampant individualists, who refuse to be categorised and are too multicoloured to go anywhere else.

After the browns, that last box is going to the most challenging to use up, the special needs scraps which won’t fit just anywhere, being too quirky, too bright, too complex. There aren’t too many scraps that defied sorting, luckily. I shall try and regard them as the leaven in my scrappy dough, the ping of colour that lifts what might otherwise be just… OK.

A rainbow scrappy quilt is now on the horizon. A scrappy block a month isn’t a big ask, and I’ll just let it grow till I think it’s time to stop or I start repeating myself – or indeed, I run out of scraps in that colour. Grab a box, sew some pieces together, trim to size, job done. And then we’ll see how many scraps are left! It’ll have the virtue of dealing with the very smallest bits (because obviously I’ll make a point of using those), leaving me with the more versatile larger pieces which almost attain the status of ‘fabric’ rather than ‘scrap’. I’m not abandoning the Anemone scrappy quilt, but it’s a different kind of project, and doesn’t eat up these smaller scraps.

Not looking forward one little bit to the pressing and trimming bit that comes next, no sir… On the upside, the Bird finger is on the mend 🙂

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Scrap Blindness

OK, well, the idea was to find a project that wouldn’t need nimble fingers, because Bird.

We’ve been talking about scraps, the care and management of. As I’ve confessed on more than one occasion, mine are like unruly children: they leave a mess everywhere, they’re into everything, they spread out of their allocated space and they darn well keep on growing. I have an uncanny ability to  ignore this growing problem and a deep-seated reluctance to address it. My current inability to sew seemed a perfect opportunity to bring about a bit of order without having to feel guilty/ tempted by a sewing project, because I can’t do that yet, but pulling scraps out of boxes and buckets, no problem.

Here’s only about 50% of the problem. Now, my classification of a scrap is anything smaller than about 3 inches square. Bigger than that, it’s fabric. Usable. It gets put away into my stash, without fail. So, these boxes, baskets and buckets are full of really small bits. Some of them tiny bits. There are one or two garments in mid-deconstruction, being  harvested for the fabric. The only way to bring this lot under control was to arm myself with some plastic bags from my dwindling supply, tip out one of the boxes and get sorting.

My brain seizes on colour first, rather than size, pattern or any other form of organisation. So that’s how I’m approaching the problem. The blue bag is done. There isn’t a scrap of blue left in any of those boxes. So are the aqua/teal and green bags. I’ve actually emptied enough of the boxes to transfer these colours back into them so I can see what’s there more easily than in a nasty grey plastic bag. Next will be yellow/ orange, then red, then pink, then purple, neutrals/black/white and finally all the multicoloured stuff that doesn’t have a strong lead colour. I thought about trying to sort all the colours at once but it didn’t work, I kept getting distracted.

Once they’re all done, I shall sort the individual box contents so they’re sorted, pressed and trimmed, tidy and colour-coded and ready for use. This is how it looks after the blue, teal and green were extracted from the overall mess.

There’s still a long way to go… I wonder how far I’ll get before I lose the will to live get bored.