Twilight 2: giving it a shot

Yes, my friends, the puns are back!

Shot cottons are gorgeous, but they can be a bit tricky to deal with. I very nearly made a silly mistake. Here’s what I mean.

Two of the cottons, which I laid out with their selected border strips last night, ready to cut and stitch this morning. Under very good LED lighting, but artificial light nonetheless.

And here’s what I saw this morning, with full sunlight shining on them and from an angle. Um… did I put those strips down on the wrong squares? Nope. I’m sure I got it right. Pick the squares up, and as if by magic, the colour changes and the strips are the right ones again. Like I said. Tricky. Both squares are woven from a combination of magenta and turquoise threads, but running in different directions. The lesson to take from this is that for matching purposes you should always view shot cottons straight on rather than from an angle, and choose your light source and stick to it,

Luckily I had my expert assistant to help me resolve the problem. He has pointed out that his blue/yellow vision is just fine and he can see teals, blues and purples, so I should definitely listen to his advice. He believes this quilt will be very nice, particularly if adorned with a light scattering of silky black dog hairs…

I just wish he wouldn’t lie right behind my sewing chair to supervise…

30 thoughts on “Twilight 2: giving it a shot

  1. It’s a good thing you cottoned on to the issue when you did!

  2. Dog hairs make all the difference 🐾

  3. Dayphoto says:

    Anything with dog hairs is ALWAYS nice!

  4. anne54 says:

    Lucky you waited. I jump in, usually without thinking things through, so the mistake would have been made. And lucky Mouse was there supervising! Good to see the puns are back. Does it mean you are feeling like your old self?

    • katechiconi says:

      I’m still at the brooding and squinting stage, seeing how best to arrange the colours. It was fortunate that I decided two existing ones weren’t working and I had to substitute these. Mouse’s input was of course invaluable, and yes, I do seem to be feeling OK, and 10kg lighter since the start of May, which has got to be a good thing!

  5. knitnkwilt says:

    Somewhere along the line I had to learn to treat these fabrics as directional prints for cutting. Sometimes it gets complicated. Ah those adorable and annoying assistants . . .

  6. nanacathy2 says:

    Well thank goodness for Mouse. Extra treats for him, and who doesn’t like added dog to things. X

  7. Those prints sound tricky – I’ll leave them to the experts! I get supervised by Roo who lies on my feet but still gets brown fluff on everything, whilst Sally the cat gets a close up view by sitting on my lap and donating silky black and white hairs. If I have to move to fetch something there is pandemonium!

    • katechiconi says:

      Mouse’s main contribution is lying at full length on the floor directly behind my chair, so when I have to turn and get up to get to the ironing board, I have to step over him – just as he decides to get up and poke me with his nose to ask for a frozen chicken neck. He’s too tall for me to stand across, so there’s high dudgeon and reproachful looks. Pandemonium, thy name is Mouse…

  8. tialys says:

    I do try not to let the beasties into my workroom but it doesn’t always work. A bit of dog and cat fluff is fine just as long as you’re keeping it in the family – outsiders might not be so appreciative.

  9. kymlucas says:

    I usually find I do much better work if I allow plenty of time to consider and reconsider a project. And I know I sound all fangirl about it, but I can’t imagine you ever making anything that is less than beautiful.

  10. claire93 says:

    I rather like the sound of your magical colour-changing fabrics ^^
    As for animal hair . . . my quilts usually stay hair-free during the making until I get to the last stage of hand-sewing the binding . . . and that’s when I bring work downstairs, sit on sofa with it, and promptly have Le Bleu on my lap.

  11. Marty K says:

    Glad your supervisor is up to the task with suggestions and contributions to the final project. After all, basic black goes with everything!

  12. cedar51 says:

    aha the magic of getting in the way, and then getting a treat – as if it was all your fault, Kate for putting your chair right in Mouses’ space…

    no pets here but a lot of thread, snips of paper and the occasional dust bunny can make things entertaining here…and then extra glue on someone’s fingers!

    • katechiconi says:

      It didn’t take him long to learn the value of pester power. I do tell hime no sometimes. He’s a little bit needy, he likes to keep an eye on me while I’m working (probably so that he can leap up if I seem to be heading for the kitchen).

      • cedar51 says:

        Kate I’m pretty sure most home pets have that value built in. When I had fur-teens they would make a huge racket. We had a fly screen on the door, it wasn’t long before one of them showed the rest that it was climable…I would open the actual door and be eyeballing one of them. The screen had to be regularly repaired…another piece cut and glued on.
        I do not miss them at all…

      • katechiconi says:

        I’d miss mine horribly… he’s not destructive, he just was more fuss and attention.

  13. Sure glad I didn’t miss this. I’ve never used shot cottons but I like learning about the differences. I just want to squeeze that Mouse and kiss his head. Those eyes are so beguiling. Right behind the chair would be an accident prone spot for me. How can you resist those eyes?

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