Move over, Noah, THIS is a storm…

 

Storm season’s here in northern NSW.  It breaks droughts, and with a loud bang, forked lightning and associated minor flooding…

On Wednesday, we crossed the Queensland/New South Wales border in warm sunshine. A few grey streaks on the horizon, nothing much to speak of…  By the time we’d travelled 300km, there were clear signs that Something had passed that way recently (the SES out putting tarps on missing roofs, trees down in paddocks, that sort of thing), and the grey streaks were now building into large, heavy black clouds, slowly gathering together and blocking out the usual bright blue.  Driving through Coffs Harbour, 60km from our destination, the rain started. It got heavier and heavier and heavier until we were totally whited out, the vertical water was almost solid, and the surface of the road had disappeared under water.  We crept along, wondering if this was what we could expect for the rest of the week, and whether, having got up the mountain, we’d ever get down again…

Quite suddenly, through Bellingen, we hit the edge of the cloud, and the rain stopped as suddenly as if someone had thrown the celestial switch.  The road was a mess, culverts overflowing, branches down, and a greasy pulp of battered leaves and twigs on the road making the hairpin mountain bends interesting to say the least.  The waterfalls were in spate, the mountain was wearing a grey angora beret of cloud low on its brow, and everything was dripping.  But the storm was over and the road was still there, no landslips this time. We’d arrived safely in Dorrigo, and warm dry beds awaited us, together with a much needed glass of something.

Next morning dawned all blue and innocent as if nothing had happened, and indeed, when we drove back down the mountain to the first of our appointments, it seemed as if nothing had.  A bit of debris, waterfalls a bit heavier than usual, but apart from that, nothing.

A thunderhead brewing, but it came to nothing

A thunderhead brewing, but it came to nothing

On the way back, it looked as if we were about to cop another load, big white thunderheads building over the mountain to the north, but  nothing came of it.

Jacarandah Alley, just one of many rows of mature jacarandah trees along the Waterfall Way. Love that colour!

Jacarandah Alley, just one of many rows of mature jacarandah trees along the Waterfall Way. Love that colour!

We were able to enjoy some spring sunshine, the jacarandas in bloom, and the galahs congregating on the fruit tree cage in my sister’s garden and being bloody noisy about it.  It’s been a fun day.  The Magpie quilt has been delivered and raved over (tomorrow I’ll post a photo showing husband and wife wrapped in their opposing team quilts…), the Morning Tea quilt has been delivered, we’ve caught up with friends and had a great lunch out with family.  Another day to go, and then we’ll be heading back north on Saturday for the concert in Brisbane.

So far, the skies are behaving themselves.  It would be Murphy’s Law exemplified if we cop another load on the way home…

Galahs enjoying a laugh on my sister's fruit tree cage, silly things

Galahs enjoying a laugh on my sister’s fruit tree cage, silly things

 

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One thought on “Move over, Noah, THIS is a storm…

  1. Barbara van Rhijn says:

    And then to think these were not unusual conditions for you when you commuted up and down that road! Last year around this time I was in Dorrigo, I know exactly where you saw the jacaranda’s and felt a twinge of longing to be there – but without the rainstorm please
    BarbaraXxx.

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